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  1. Out Of The Lab And Into The Streets, Science Community Marches For Science
    Thousands of scientists and their supporters took to the streets to advocate for public support for science and technology today in Washington, D.C., and other cities around the country.
  2. Can Placebos Work If You Know They're Placebos?
    NPR's Mary Louise Kelly asks writer Robert Siegel about "open label placebos" and whether placebos work even when patients know they're placebos. He wrote about his experience in Smithsonian Magazine.
  3. Researchers Find Yet Another Reason Why Naked Mole-Rats Are Just Weird
    The hairless, ground-dwelling, cold-blooded rodents have proven capable of surviving total oxygen deprivation. Their odd biology allows them to run on an alternative fuel.
  4. Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing
    Research in epilepsy has found a key to why small pulses of electricity to the brain sometimes help and sometimes hurt a failing memory. Brains hurt by physical trauma or dementia might benefit, too.
  5. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds
    Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people.
  6. FDA Approval Of Hepatitis C Drugs For Kids Is Likely To Speed Treatment
    Many insurers have required that adults with hepatitis C be very sick before they can get access to expensive drug treatment. But Medicaid has special rules that may get kids and teens access sooner.
  7. Researchers Examine The Psychology Of Protest Movements
    Social science researchers examine whether extreme protest tactics are an effective way for recruiting popular support. The public may not be relating to protesters like the way protesters aimed for.
  8. Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works
    Treating addiction is expensive and patients often relapse. A new company is offering better results at a price that's lower in the long run — and clients get treatment right at home.
  9. Untangling The Mystery Of Why Shoelaces Come Untied
    Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley have figured out why shoelaces seem to come untied at the worst moments, like when you're running.
  10. Spider Scientists Find 50 New Species
    A team of arachnologists discovered over 50 new species of spider in Cape York, Australia. Dr. Robert Raven is one of them. He tells Lulu Garcia-Navarro about the expedition and their findings.
  11. How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating
    The hypercompetitive world of biomedical research occasionally drives scientists to cheat. More often, scientists make decisions that undercut their results. That can lead colleagues astray.
  12. Scientists Find Signs That Saturn's Moon Enceladus Might Be Hospitable To Life
    "This is the closest we've come, so far, to identifying a place with some of the ingredients needed for a habitable environment," NASA says. There are signs of a promising reaction under the surface.
  13. Eels May Use 'Magnetic Maps' As They Slither Across The Ocean
    Eels sometimes swim thousands of miles from their birthplace in the Atlantic to rivers and lakes where they live. Researchers say the creatures might use the Earth's magnetic field to find their way.
  14. What Doesn't Kill You Can Maim: Unexpected Injuries From Opioids
    Emergency room doctors are just beginning to study a new kind of casualty in the opioid epidemic — patients who survive an overdose, but walk away with brain damage, kidney failure or dead muscle.
  15. There Are More Than 60,000 Tree Species Worldwide, Scientists Say
    More than half of those species are only found in a single country, and many of them face extinction. The scientists hope that this database will be an important tool for conservationists.
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