Science on Religion

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Patrick McNamara: Neurophilosophy or Neuromania?

Closer to Truth is a PBS television program hosted by Robert Lawrence Kuhn that focuses on the big questions of consciousness, the nature of the cosmos, and God. Recently, Dr. Patrick McNamara, co-founding director of the Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion, was interviewed for Closer to Truth on the difference between "neurophilosophy" and "neuromania." See the video here.

Patrick McNamara: How Does the Subconscious Work?

Closer to Truth is a PBS television program hosted by Robert Lawrence Kuhn that focuses on the big questions of consciousness, the nature of the cosmos, and God. Recently, Dr. Patrick McNamara, co-founding director of the Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion, was interviewed for Closer to Truth on how the subconscious works. See the video here.

Patrick McNamara: Are Brain and Mind the Same Thing?

Closer to Truth is a PBS television program hosted by Robert Lawrence Kuhn that focuses on the big questions of consciousness, the nature of the cosmos, and God. Recently, Dr. Patrick McNamara, co-founding director of the Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion, was interviewed for Closer to Truth on the relationship between the mind and brain. See the video here.

Interview: Connor Wood on empathy and biology

Connor Wood, a Ph.D. student at Boston University and scholar at the Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion, researches the effects of religious practice and behavior on the body, specifically focusing on religion, spirituality, and health. Connor was interviewed recently by Edwin Rutsch of the Center for Building a Culture of Empathy on the subjects of empathy, biology, and religion – a conversation inspired by an article that appeared on ScienceOnReligion.org about recent research on rats and empathy.

The Neuroscience of Religious Experience: An Interview with Patrick McNamara (Pt. 2)

The neuroscience of religious experience: an interview with Patrick McNamara, Part. 2

Randall Stephens' interview of Boston University neuroscientist Patrick McNamara

Dr. Patrick McNamara, Director of the Evolutionary Neurobehavior Laboratory in the Department of Neurology (BU School of Medicine), has published numerous books and articles on the neuroscience of religion and the evolution of religious behaviors. His work attempts to chart a middle course between scientific reductionism and the humanities' approaches to the study of religion. In the summer of 2009, Randall Stephens (Eastern Nazarene College) interviewed Dr. McNamara on his research, asking questions about how the neuroscientific study of religion has developed over time and where it might go in the future. This is part 2 of 2.

The Neuroscience of Religious Experience: An Interview with Patrick McNamara (Pt. 1)

The neuroscience of religious experience: an interview with Patrick McNamara, Part. 1

Randall Stephens' interview of Boston University neuroscientist Patrick McNamara

Dr. Patrick McNamara, Director of the Evolutionary Neurobehavior Laboratory in the Department of Neurology (BU School of Medicine), has published numerous books and articles on the neuroscience of religion and the evolution of religious behaviors. His work attempts to chart a middle course between scientific reductionism and the humanities' approaches to the study of religion. In the summer of 2009, Randall Stephens (Eastern Nazarene College) interviewed Dr. McNamara on his research, asking questions about how the neuroscientific study of religion has developed over time and where it might go in the future. This is part 1 of 2.

Video - Wildman Lecture - October 1, 2007

Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous, Lecture 2 of 6

Spirituality and the Brain: A Scientific Approach to Religious Experience, by Wesley J. Wildman

Wesley J. Wildman, a School of Theology associate professor of theology and ethics, takes a scientific approach to the discussion of religious and spiritual experiences in the second lecture in the six-part series Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous. He explains current techniques for neurological studies of religious and spiritual experiences and debates their impact on our philosophical and scientific understanding of the supernatural. Hosted by Center for the Study of Religion and Psychology at Boston University's Danielsen Institute on October 1, 2007.

Video - Wildman Lecture - December 10, 2007

Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous, Lecture 3 of 6

A Smorgasbord of Dangers and Delights: The Phenomenology of Religious Experience, by Wesley J. Wildman

In the third of his six lectures on Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous, Wesley J. Wildman, School of Theology associate professor of philosophy, theology, and ethics, describes several kinds of religious and spiritual experiences - and explains what they tell us about psychology, theology, and evolutionary theory. Hosted by Center for the Study of Religion and Psychology at Boston University's Danielsen Institute on December 10, 2007

Video - Wildman Lecture - March 17, 2008

Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous, Lecture 5 of 6

Peeking Behind the Ideological Curtain: The Social Dynamics of Religious Experience, by Wesley J. Wildman

Wesley J. Wildman, a School of Theology associate professor of theology and ethics, explores how social and evolutionary needs shape our religious beliefs and behaviors in the fifth lecture in the six-part series Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous at Boston University's Danielsen Institute. Hosted by Center for the Study of Religion and Psychology at Boston University's Danielsen Institute on March 17, 2008.

Video - Wildman Lecture - April 14, 2008

Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous, Lecture 6 of 6

Make It Start, Make It Stop!: The Future of Religious Experience, by Wesley J. Wildman

Wesley J. Wildman, a School of Theology associate professor of theology and ethics, discusses the promise that technology and science hold for the future of human religion and spirituality in the sixth lecture in the six-part series Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous at Boston University's Danielsen Institute. Hosted by Center for the Study of Religion and Psychology at Boston University's Danielsen Institute on April 14, 2008.

Video - Wildman Lecture - February 25, 2008

Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous, Lecture 4 of 6

Can You Trust Your Instincts? The Cognitive Reliability of Religious Experience, by Wesley J. Wildman

Wesley J. Wildman, a School of Theology associate professor of theology and ethics, explores the value of the spiritual experiences that often shape religious beliefs - and how philosophers determine which experiences are reliable - in the fourth lecture in the six-part series Religious Experiences: From the Mundane to the Anomalous at Boston University's Danielsen Institute. Hosted by Center for the Study of Religion and Psychology at Boston University's Danielsen Institute on February 25, 2008.

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